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Naval Heritage Centenary

 

 

Welcome to our centenary

Our Staff Top 10 Objects

WYLLIE PANORAMA

Wyllie panorama choice of Julain Thomas

It was painted in 1929/30 to help people picture how the Battle of Trafalgar looked, to raise money for a new museum dedicated to the Victory and as the final expression of Wyllie's great passion for ships and the sea.  He died less than a year after completing it, aged 80

Julian Thomas, Head of Development and Fundraising

ROYAL BARGE OF CHARLES II

State barge of Charles II used for Nelson's funeral choice of

I think that Nelson’s Funeral Barge would be my favourite item because it typifies the great esteem in which he was held by the Nation.( or maybe because of my great age!!!!)

 SLEDGE AND SKIS OF PETTY OFFICER WILLIAMSON

Although it might not be directly significant from naval history point of view as such, its an example of how the navy has links to all sorts of other things in history that people might not necessarily think of in connection with us

Julie Gray, Internal Resources Officer

HMS EURYDICE FIGUREHEAD

Figurehead of HMS Eurydice choice of Erica New

It first caught my eye because of her outstretched hands and the expression on her face - she looks frightening and it seems as if she might be trying to drag sailors into the sea to drown them! Not the sort of thing you’d expect to see on a ship! I later found out that she wasn’t some kind of evil goddess as I’d thought originally, but actually her story was very sad and she was actually being carried off into the underworld away from her husband!

Erica New, Fundraising Research Assistant

NELSON DEATH MASK

Nelson death mask choice of Admiral Sir Jonathan Band

choice of Admiral Sir Jonathan Band GCB, DL, AC

BELL FROM THE RESCUE SHIP RATHLIN

Bell from the rescue ship Rathlin choice of Stephen Courtney

The Rathlin started life as a passenger / cargo vessel on the Clyde in Scotland in 1936. During World War 2 she took on the important role as a convoy rescue ship, following up at the rear of convoys to rescue the crews of any ships that were sunk by u-boats or enemy aircraft. The Rathlin escorted 24 convoys and is credited with saving the lives of 634 men, the highest number recorded by any convoy rescue ship. Although they were not glamorous, the rescue ships performed a dangerous and vital job, a reassuring presence for the other ships in the convoy. They should be better remembered for saving so many lives

Stephen Courtney, Curator of Photographs

PRISONER OF WAR BONE SHIP MODELS

At first glance they just seem to be ordinary models but when you look closer and read about them how and why they were made they become much more interesting! I think they reveal the personal cost and stories of big conflicts and make them seem more human!

Claire Jordan, Learning Officer

GLASS BOTTLE RESCUED FROM THE RUBBLE OF HIROSHIMA

Glass bottle rescued from the rubble of Hiroshima choice of Grahm Dobbin

It is haunting, evocative and thought provoking

Graham Dobbin, Chief Operating Officer

ARKELL SEA CHEST

Arkell sea chest choice of Roxy Martin-Cottee

This chest has a really personal feel about it. It is quite literally a sailors complete life in a box.

Roxy Martin-Cottee, Events Assistant

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